On a foreign ship

A long time passed and once again I heard that hum. I thought confusedly of Lazaroni, who was rocked by the same hum, and at last I imagined myself to be Lazaroni himself and wanted to sit down to see if the black hands had already crept into my room; but I could not move, and I was so weak that I could only open my eyes with difficulty. The buzzing did not stop, and it was so dark that I saw nothing, and vaguely I remembered black snowflakes that were sprinkled on me … Did the black hands sprinkle them? I tried to think about it, but couldn’t. I wanted to call, but my tongue stuck to the palate of my mouth, which I opened, but not the faintest sound I could not make. Meanwhile the buzzing continued to fill my ears. I wanted to raise my hands to remove the black snowflakes, but I lacked the strength; too thick a layer of such snowflakes lay on them. Once again I opened my eyes, and the black surroundings brightened a little. The thick layer on my hands lost its black color, and changed to white … Did the white hands do that? … Was I really Lazaroni? … He woke up on a bed, I woke up on a bed too, because suddenlyI noticed that I was no longer lying on the bottom of a boat, but on a bed … So I could be Lazaroni, because in my opinion I’m not sailing now … So I wasn’t the same boy who ran away with his dog … However, I owned a dog … Was I Lazaroni? … Was I another boy? … Thinking about it, I was worried about the animal I once owned … Little by little I felt in I the strength to move the tongue; I strained my strength and said softly: “Japheth … Japheth.”

Once again I noticed two hands, but they were neither black nor white, but of an ordinary color. One of them was holding a bottle, the other a spoon that that hand had put between my lips. A strange liquor wet my tongue and throat. A warm feeling ran through my veins and I regained consciousness. The hands were still there and I saw that they belonged to a foreign man who was standing in front of me. I stared at him and said again: “Japheth!”

– Jafet? He asked.

“Yes,” I answered, “Japheth.”

The surroundings were now as bright as day, and I felt much better, though still very weak. The stranger began to speak, but all his words were so foreign to me that I did not understand one.

– Jafet! I said.

The man spoke a few more words, but seeing that I did not understand him, he went away.

I looked around and saw that I was lying on a white bed in a small room where everything looked amazingly beautiful. I saw many objects I had never seen before, and I was amazed. “Where am I?” I asked myself.

At that moment the stranger returned and was accompanied by another man. The latter went to my cot and sat down on a chair I had not yet noticed. Then he said a few words, but I understood only one, Jafet.

“Yes,” said I in a faint voice, “where is Japheth?”

He shook his head, pulled my hand out from under the white blanket, and felt my pulse; then he spoke to the other man, who had left, but at once returned with a cup. The seated gentleman took the cup and carried it to my mouth. I drank until no drop was left and felt stronger, but I could not sit down. I therefore remained lying down and the men looked at me intently. The sitter touched my cheeks, and I felt his hand be cold. He removed from my forehead a white cloth which I had not noticed there, and taking a comb, he combed my hair, while he smiled kindly at me.

– Jafet! I said again, and he shook his head. I was afraid the dog was dead.

At that moment other men came looking at me curiously; never have I seen so many people together. They started talking to each other, but I didn’t understand anything. Then the seated man, who seemed to me an eminent gentleman, thought for a moment and asked me again. It seemed to me that his voice suddenly changed as if another person were speaking. I was very surprised at this, but was silent because I did not understand him. Then his voice changed for the second time, and fortunately I understood two words from everything he said, namely the words stad and namen , and I replied in my Island language:

– Dict bi bi stad – which means: “Right next to the city.” He kept asking me questions and I understood the words Fater and leeft , which I translated to myself as father and alive .

“Op ‘t ajlnd,” I answered, wanting to make it clear that he lived on the Island .

– Ajlnd? He asked further; – English ajlnd?

I thought he was asking if my father lived on an English island, but not knowing to which country the Island belonged, I replied:

– ‘k Loof van najt -, which means: – I think not.

Again he thought, then asked:

– Hu is Jafet?

I translated the question with “how is Japheth?” And I said:

– ‘k Wajt najt, vast vel dom, van haj vol mi bit’n [2] . Those words, which no doubt sounded strange in the eminent gentleman’s ears, were incomprehensible to him, but he persisted for another moment in finding out who I was and where I had come from, and he asked:

“Hajst du Jafet?”

I understood that he had asked if my name was Japheth, and at once I answered:

– Ikke? … no! – What does it mean: – Me? … no!

“Do you speak Danish?” … dance dance? He asked suddenly.

“Parrots prot deens,” I answered, and imitating our parrot I said further: “Go til fanen!” [3]

Surprised, the gentleman looked at me and laughed, then he felt my pulse again to see if I had a fever, and translating my last words to those present, everyone laughed heartily, which I was very surprised at. Then he asked a few more questions, which I did not understand; he shook his head and caressing my cheeks, he got up and walked away. The others followed him, and I was left alone.

Over my head I heard a strange noise from time to time, and I was curious as to what it was, and thought of it when, once more, footsteps sounded on the stairs by which one could enter and exit my little room. I turned my gaze to the gate, which was always open when someone entered, for it was just below the stairs. I saw a very strange man enter. He had a very small, almost round trunk, but very long arms and legs. His head almost completely disappeared between his high shoulders. He wore white clothes and a white cap covered his head. On one of his arms hung a white cloth, and in his hands he held a large tray of nickel, on which stood plates of food.

In the “Thousand and One Nights” stood a man-dressed monkey, and it seemed to me that such a monkey had suddenly entered.

He smiled (I began to believe that all people except my parents almost always smile at me) and approached me, put the tray on the bed and motioned for me to sit down. I did that with his help; he pushed the pillow against my back so that I could sit more comfortably, and hanging the white cloth over my neck in front of my chest, he pointed to the food. I looked at the plates and then at the man, not knowing what I should eat, for I had never seen such food. He probably understood that and fed me. At first he presented me with something white that looked like starch. I found it delicious. In the same way he fed me some fruit. His chest protruded so much that it sometimes touched my head. Every time he bent down, I noticed that his back was also protruding. Later I found out that he is a cook and a hunchback. He patiently stood by my bed until I had eaten enough, then he took the towel off my neck, arranged the pillow for me, and I lay down. Then he left with the cutlery. At the door he turned, smiled, nodded, and disappeared, closing the door behind him.

I was tired and thinking of the strange person who had just left me, I closed my eyes and fell asleep.

I slept a long time, and waking up I felt very good. The headache didn’t hurt me anymore, and I could think well, and I thought. I felt like I had been sick with hunger and thirst. After the food the cook had brought me, my strength had returned. I did not see my clothes, otherwise I would have gotten up, but due to their absence I was forced to stay on my bed. I sat down though and examined my little room. It was very small and painted brown. Next to me in the wooden wall (because I thought it was called that) was a window all round with a yellow transparent curtain. It seemed to me that on the outside of that window, but a little further down, stood someone who from time to time threw frothy water to clean the glass. Through that glass I saw only the blue sky. The floor was covered with carpet, and on it stood two benches on the walls; a tablet hung from the ceiling. I was very surprised by that tablet, because a hanging table was for me something completely new and extraordinary.

I was a little hungry after a long sleep and wanted some food to be brought, and I waited patiently until someone would bring it. During that time I asked myself many questions: “How did I get into this little room? “Where have I been?” “How long would I stay here?” “Couldn’t any of the people here understand me?” “Where should I go?” “Wouldn’t the people in Hamburg understand me, too?” “Could I learn the language spoken by my new companions… And so on and so forth, until the gate opened and the same strange person came in with the tray on which, as yesterday, food and drink stood.” Seeing me, the cook immediately noticed that he was welcome. I ateand drank without his help and when I was full I said I would like to get up. He raised his high shoulders so that his head went even deeper between them, and raised his eyebrows; his face and his movements told me quite clearly that he did not understand me. I pushed the blankets aside, and hanging my legs from the bed, I indicated by signs that I wished to put on my trousers. He understood, but his face, which seemed to be able to express almost all his thoughts, said: “I don’t know if it’s allowed …, Ican’t allow, but maybe another person will allow, and he pointed up. I withdrew my legs and remained sitting on my bed. Once again the cook pointed up and made it clear to me that he would ask someone up there if I could get up. I thanked him. He went away and after a while the eminent gentleman entered. He patted my shoulder in a friendly manner, spoke little and felt my pulse. He seemed to be satisfied with the state of my health, for when he opened a very small door on the side of my bed, he took off my clothes and I was able to get up and get dressed. Then I left my little room, went upstairs, and I went found me on the deck of a large sailing ship. From my Island I had seen thousands of ships, but always from a great distance; for the first time I could look at a ship in all the details and as the eminent gentleman allowed me to do so, I examined this ship very carefully. Coming to the back, I saw my boat quite unexpectedly. It lay on one side, the mast was taken out and lay behind it on the curled sail. I immediately looked at the bottom and found the box under which I had imprisoned my dog. Japheth was gone, however. I pointed with my finger at the box to one of the crew and it seemed that my questioning eyes made him understand what I wanted to know. He in turn pointed to the sea,made a sad expression and said a word I did not understand. I no longer doubted Japheth’s fate, however; the beast was not on the ship, nor under the ark, so it died and rested on the bottom of the sea. I was very sad, but cooked my peas and gave up because nothing could be done to get the dog back to me.

In a little room with a lot of steam coming out, I found the cook. He smiled, waved and called to me. I went into his little room (the ship’s kitchen) and after he showed me a stool so I could sit down, I watched as he prepared the food and cleaned dishes, forks and spoons. I understood that I would like to help him and he agreed. I was happy that I could be useful on the ship, and from that time I was the assistant of the cook with whom I soon became friends and who taught me many names of objects in the kitchen and on the ship, but to converse. we could only do bad. The sailors and even the captain and the eminent gentleman who was the doctor were always very kind to me and the whole crew called me Japheth, believing that to be my name. At first I was surprised by this, but then I found out, that the doctor had understood from my words that my name was Japheth. I was satisfied with it and since I didn’t have a name at all, except for “boy”, I decided to keep it.

Our ship was a three-masted schooner. Where it came from and where it was sailing, I was initially unable to find out, because when I asked that, I got answers that I didn’t quite understand. After a few days the cook had just given me, that it came from London and was velveturanta to Patersburgo [4] .

Was Patersburg a city, a country, or something else? He could not answer those questions because he did not understand me.

One day he presented me with a large silver coin, which I looked at in surprise, for it was quite foreign to me. When I wanted to return the coin, he said that money was mine. Then I took out my bag and showed my nickel money.

During our trip the weather was always nice and the days passed quickly as I worked with pleasure. Three more times the cook gave me a big coin, and each time I put it in my bag.

I don’t know how many days I spent on the ship because I didn’t count them. The future did not make me worried at all, because everything was going well. I didn’t think about whether I would stay on the ship or leave it once we got to town; that would depend on the circumstances, and with confidence I went to meet the life that fate had reserved for me. I no longer slept in that same little room where I had spent the first day, but in bed immediately after the kitchen. In that dormitory were two beds, one under the other. The cook was sleeping under me, but luckily he wasn’t snoring.

After a long voyage our ship arrived in the harbor of a large city and I understood then that that city was Patersburg, for I had often heard that name pronounced.

The harbor was full of ships of all kinds. I saw schooners, frigates, steamers. Everywhere small boats with sailors moved among themselves to row a city or to return to the ships.

Our schooner lay about three hundred paces from the quay, and clearly I could see the rows of houses extending to the right and to the left. Sitting on a box I looked at everything with curiosity; it was the first time I had seen a city and I wanted to enter it. I thought about it and started thinking about what all the people who live there do, because not everyone could be sailors, shoemakers.or bakers; I have heard little about other trades. For an hour I was watching everything there in the streets and in the harbor, when someone slapped me on the shoulder. The cook was standing next to me, but at first glance I did not recognize him. He wore black clothes and a hat and held a stick in his hand. At the same time I saw two other sailors coming down a rope ladder that hung on the side of the ship and that led to a boat right next to our ship. The sailors were going back to the quay to visit the city. I showed the boat. The cook realized I wanted to go with the sailors and by pushing me up the stairs he helped me down. He followed me and there we were, four of us, sitting in the boat. I was glad I was finally going to visit a city. Twice, halfway to Patersburg, I saw two cities in the distance; I remember

When I first thought about cities, I always imagined that they consist of wonderfully beautiful streets, as clean as the cleanest floor and that the houses are beautifully painted and look like I saw them in the pictures of “A Thousand and One Nights”. Even after the first step on the platform, however, I realized that I was wrong. The streets of Patersburg were full of dust and dirt and the houses were old; instead of being beautifully painted, they were not painted at all, but seemed to me mere piles of red stones.

We went together through a maze of narrow streets and after half an hour the two sailors went their own way and left the cook and me alone. So we went on in pairs. I saw objects that were completely foreign to me and animals I had never seen before. I was very amazed at bicycles, horses and especially at vehicles that rode aheadwithout a horse, but my astonishment reached the highest degree when I saw dogs. It seemed to me that they were painted, for their color was very different from that of Japheth. I couldn’t find out, though, because the cook wouldn’t understand me. Silently I therefore went to his side. Dressed as a cook, he was an ugly man, but in his black clothes he was still much uglier. His thin legs took very long steps and at every second step he raised his staff and put it back on the street, after which he took two more steps. I wondered why he did that. In the meantime we continued on our way and I wondered where we were going. On the streets went many people who did not pay attention to each other. A few boys shouted at us after they passed us, and the cook showed an angry face, but he said nothing and continued the walk with me. We had already walked through many streets and I was amazed that one city could contain so many houses and so many people and willingly or unwillingly I thought of John and Hamburg. I was not, however, in Hamburg, but in Patersburg; I did not walk with John, but with an ugly cook, who was mocked by the boys and who was nevertheless a good man. He had given me three large coins and had shown that he was not a miser at all.

Finally we came into a wide street with tall houses that looked cleaner. My companion entered one of them, whose door stood open. I followed him and we were in a kind of shop where a lot of items such as tobacco cases, cigarettes, tobacco, cigars and so on were for sale. The cook bought a new pipe and tobacco and asked me if I wanted a pipe, but I refused because I couldn’t smoke. Only my father smoked on the Island. Despite my rejection, he bought me a thin stick. After paying he left the shop and I followed him again. I grabbed my staffand wanted to imitate with it the movements which the cook made with his own, but alas! After a few steps it slipped between the stones of the street; I didn’t notice that and when I took a step forward, the chef’s beautiful gift was suddenly broken. A piece remained between the stones and the longer piece I held in my hand. My companion laughed out loud. I laughed too, though I was sorry, but cooked my peas. I pulled out my knife and cutting off the splinters, I walked on with my shortened stick. The cook made it clear to me that he wanted to buy another, but I didn’t accept because mine was long enough. Sometimes we stopped in front of nice shops, but most of all I admired a thick tall tower in the middle of a square. It was the first time I had seen the bottom of a tower. However, I also looked around the top to see the bell, which does always ring when people go to church, but I didn’t see it. At that moment I heard a loud noise behind me and turning, I saw a group of riders on horses. I stopped to look at them better. Each rider had a long spear in his hand and wore a high hat made, as I supposed, of painted goatskin. It was a long time before the last one passed and we took another walk.

‘Cossacks! Said the cook.

So I saw a bunch of Cossacks. Although I had been walking for more than an hour, the streets were not over, but it seemed to me that we had finally reached our destination, for the cook had once again entered a house. The door through which we entered was high and at the vestibule I saw a woman to whom the cook had spoken for some time. She pointed in front of her and we followed the direction she had pointed. We walked along a long corridor, on either side of which were many doors. On each side stood a painted letter or numbers.Finally the cook found the number he was looking for. He opened the door and entered. We were in a small room where an old woman was sitting working at a table. As soon as she saw us, she jumped up and fell on the neck of the cook, who kissed her. After that heartfelt greeting we sat down and the woman, who was very happy, started talking to the cook, who in my opinion was her son. They talked a lot about me and the woman treated me to cookies, sandwiches and coffee with sugar. Although I was not hungry, I ate to please her. She stroked my hair, smiled and was very happy because her son was back. We stayed a long time, after which the cook got up to leave with me. Before leaving the little room, he gave his mother a lot of money, which she put in a closet. The old woman accompanied us to the high door and waved at us many more times; then we were on the street again. Finally her greeting hand disappeared and we continued our way through the maze of streets. Whether we went back to the harbor or whether we went along other streets farther into the city, I did not know, for almost all the streets resembled each other, but a moment later I thought I was in a street that we had been before. I heard the hum of voices in one of the houses and the cook entered. I followed him and we were in a living room where stood long benches with tables. Many people sat here and there and chatted loudly, laughed and drank yellow or white liquor. After a long buffet stood a fat man who filled glasses, while another man carried them to the occupants. I was in a sailor bar. then we were on the street again. Finally her greeting hand disappeared and we continued our way through the maze of streets. Whether we went back to the harbor or whether we went along other streets farther into the city, I did not know, for almost all the streets resembled each other, but a moment later I thought I was in a street that we had been before. I heard the hum of voices in one of the houses and the cook entered. I followed him and we were in a living room where stood long benches with tables. Many people sat here and there and chatted loudly, laughed and drank yellow or white liquor. After a long buffet stood a fat man who filled glasses, while another man carried them to the occupants. I was in a sailor bar. then we were on the street again. Finally her greeting hand disappeared and we continued our way through the maze of streets. Whether we went back to the harbor or whether we went along other streets farther into the city, I did not know, for almost all the streets resembled each other, but a moment later I thought I was in a street that we had been before. I heard the hum of voices in one of the houses and the cook entered. I followed him and we were in a living room where stood long benches with tables. Many people sat here and there and chatted loudly, laughed and drank yellow or white liquor. After a long buffet stood a fat man filling glasses, while another man carried them to the occupants. I was in a sailor bar. Whether we went back to the harbor or whether we went along other streets farther into the city, I did not know, for almost all the streets resembled each other, but a moment later I thought I was in a street that we had been before. I heard the hum of voices in one of the houses and the cook entered. I followed him and we were in a living room where stood long benches with tables. Many people sat here and there and chatted loudly, laughed and drank yellow or white liquor. After a long buffet stood a fat man who filled glasses, while another man carried them to the occupants. I was in a sailor bar. Whether we went back to the harbor or whether we went along other streets farther into the city, I did not know, for almost all the streets resembled each other, but a moment later I thought I was in a street that we had been before. I heard the hum of voices in one of the houses and the cook entered. I followed him and we were in a living room where stood long benches with tables. Many people sat here and there and chatted loudly, laughed and drank yellow or white liquor. After a long buffet stood a fat man who filled glasses, while another man carried them to the occupants. I was in a sailor bar. I heard the hum of voices in one of the houses and the cook entered. I followed him and we were in a living room where stood long benches with tables. Many people sat here and there and chatted loudly, laughed and drank yellow or white liquor. After a long buffet stood a fat man who filled glasses, while another man carried them to the occupants. I was in a sailor bar. I heard the hum of voices in one of the houses and the cook entered. I followed him and we were in a living room where stood long benches with tables. Many people sat here and there and chatted loudly, laughed and drank yellow or white liquor. After a long buffet stood a fat man who filled glasses, while another man carried them to the occupants. I was in a sailor bar.

“Ivan! Ivan!” Cried a voice suddenly.

“Ivan! Ivan!” Cried others, and Ivan, who was my companion, raised both hands, clapped them a few times, and laughed aloud; then he approached a number of people sitting together at the same table and gave them to themthe hand. They greeted each other, after which one of them pointed a finger at me, asking something that made the others laugh out loud. Ivan laughed too, sat down, and began to tell me, each time looking at me, and as the others also looked at me with visible surprise, I guessed that the cook had told how his teammates had found me at sea and that no one knew yet who I was and from where I came from. Everyone listened with interest and when my friend Ivan fell silent, one of the others addressed a few words to the sailors, and everyone applauded loudly. In the meantime the bar-serving man had placed before Ivan a glass of water-colored liquor, which he emptied at once; then the sportsman brought two glasses, one for Ivan and one for me. I tasted the liquor, but spat it out with disgust, for it so burned my mouth, that tears came into my eyes. The sailors had a lot of fun. It seemed, however, that Ivan loved that drink very much, for he drank many glasses of it and became very merry. The sailor, who had been applauded so loudly, now got up and everyone looked at him. I was very curious about what he would do. He pushed aside a few benches so that an empty spot formed on the floor. Then he sat down on one heel and throwing forward the other leg, he began to dance in a strange way. Here he jumped forward, now back, while his heels in turn and tactfully touched the floor. Here he rose suddenly, turned round himself, and danced again and again, left and right, occasionally clapping his hands behind him and in front of him; so he danced for a while while all the sailors in the hall watched him intently. At last he stopped and sat down, applauded aloud by all the spectators. He turned red from a strong strain and drank out the contents of a large glass full of brown liquor. Then he took off his cap andwent past the men who were still standing around the place where he had danced. To each he handed the cap and each threw a silver coin. I was very surprised at this, but was even more amazed when he went to me, took off my cap, and poured in all the money collected. I looked at the dancer in surprise and everyone laughed out loud. Ivan gestured to me that the money was mine, and pulling the bag out of my pocket, he put into it the coins which the dancing sailor had earned for me. I was very excited, put the bag in my pocket, but did not know how to thank my benefactor; so I presented him with my hand, which he pressed hard. The sailors were very thirsty and drank a lot, but none as much as Ivan, who liked that water-like liquor very much. He drank at least six or seven glasses and after each glass he became happier. His hat sat crookedly on his hair and his eyes turned glassy red. At last he began to sing and even tried to dance, but in this he failed, for after the second step he fell to the floor, applauded aloud by all the sailors. He got up at once, however, but finding that his legs were too weak to dance, he sat down, drank, and sang, sometimes tapping me on the shoulders. I marveled at his conduct; I didn’t know he was drunk, because I had never seen a drunk man before. I marveled at his conduct; I didn’t know he was drunk, because I had never seen a drunk man before. I marveled at his conduct; I didn’t know he was drunk, because I had never seen a drunk man before.

The dancing sailor after a while left with many others, only a few remained in the bar. I was glad when Ivan finally got up too, paid what he owed and left with me.

After Ivan drank the glasses of water-colored liquor, he looked like a completely different man. Before that time he had walked like a brave soldier and wielded his staff in a skilful manner, as if he were the most eminent gentleman in the city, but having drunk that liquor he could scarcely walk; he leaned on the stick, grabbed my shoulder so as not to lose his balance, and his feet moved so softly forward and sideways thatI marveled at his weakness and was afraid that he would suddenly fall ill. I felt very sorry for him and when I looked into his glassy eyes, my pity became even greater. He wanted to speak, but began to speak a language even stranger than usual. He stammered in a terrifying way, but spoke as if I understood everything he said. ‘Oh, if only I were at the harbor! I thought, but in my opinion the harbor was very far away, and the forces had already left the poor fellow. Some of the boys mocked him and Ivan stopped, looked at the mockers with his glassy eyes and threatened them with the stick, which made them very amused. His arm rested so heavily on my shoulder that I could barely stand. I wanted to go on, but as the boys mocked him again and pointed their tongues, the cook became so furious that he left me to beat the mockers, but ho ve! he fell to his knees, after which the boys laughed. I managed to set him up, however, and we were about to continue our journey when other boys ran up, who in turn mocked the drunken cook. He no longer tried to hit them, for he was afraid of falling, but stammering and threatening the boys with the stick, he went on. Nearby was a shop with large glass, after which merchandise was exhibited. Always stammering and walking as if he were a rental boat, he approached that glass and looked inside. Inside stood two young women who could not help laughing at the strange gestures and steps of the sailor. He also threatened them with his staff and they stepped back, but immediately a gentleman appeared on the same spot. He said in a commanding voice a few words, which the cook at once answered, brandishing his staff. I was so scared that I left my friend. The boys shouted louder and louder in mocking words. Ivan turned to threaten them again. In the meantime a crowd of curious men and women had gathered before the shop to see what happens. Everyone laughed and had fun. I had no idea what to think of Ivan. He was definitely not dangerously ill (I thought) because people didn’t feel sorry for him.

Among the spectators stood two saber-armed men whom I believed to be soldiers. They just smiled, but said nothing. In my opinion they were not cops, because otherwise they would have kicked out the useless boys. Just as Ivan was turning, two boys arrived, one of whom was carrying an egg basket on his arm. They shared the general joy. Ivan threatened the gentleman in the shop, the boys. The shopkeeper finally appeared on the threshold of the shop and said a few words to the armed men, who nevertheless pretended to be deaf, for they had done nothing to silence the boys, nor to take the threatening sailor away. This one became more and more furious and swung the stick, as if he were about to throw it at the laughing crowd. Suddenly an egg flew through the air, described a beautiful semicircle and hit the cook right on the nose, where it broke. Loud laughter and screams erupted everywhere. The victim shouted like a savage, took a step forward to throw himself at the boys, but stumbled and dropped the stick. He turned to look for where it had fallen, but lost his balance and fell, head forward, through the large glass. A loud tinkling of broken pieces of glass hit my ears. The boys ran away and here I saw the poor cook. His legs hung from the window and the rest of his body lay on the exhibited merchandise. He pulled his legs behind him and there he was, sitting on the couch. He was wounded on the hands and face, and a moment later his face was covered in blood. He no longer spoke, but looked around as if not knowing what had happened. I stood at some distance, but no The victim shouted like a savage, took a step forward to throw himself at the boys, but stumbled and dropped the stick. He turned to look for where it had fallen, but lost his balance and fell, head forward, through the large glass. A loud tinkling of broken pieces of glass hit my ears. The boys ran away and here I saw the poor cook. His legs hung from the window and the rest of his body lay on the exhibited merchandise. He pulled his legs behind him and there he was, sitting on the couch. He was wounded on the hands and face, and a moment later his face was covered in blood. He no longer spoke, but looked around as if not knowing what had happened. I stood at some distance, but no The victim shouted like a savage, took a step forward to throw himself at the boys, but stumbled and dropped the stick. He turned to look for where it had fallen, but lost his balance and fell, head forward, through the large glass. A loud tinkling of broken pieces of glass hit my ears. The boys ran away and here I saw the poor cook. His legs hung from the window and the rest of his body lay on the exhibited merchandise. He pulled his legs behind him and there he was, sitting on the couch. He was wounded on the hands and face, and a moment later his face was covered in blood. He no longer spoke, but looked around as if not knowing what had happened. I stood at some distance, but no He turned to look for where it had fallen, but lost his balance and fell, head forward, through the large glass. A loud tinkling of broken pieces of glass hit my ears. The boys ran away and here I saw the poor cook. His legs hung from the window and the rest of his body lay on the exhibited merchandise. He pulled his legs behind him and there he was, sitting on the couch. He was wounded on the hands and face, and a moment later his face was covered in blood. He no longer spoke, but looked around as if not knowing what had happened. I stood at some distance, but no He turned to look for where it had fallen, but lost his balance and fell, head forward, through the large glass. A loud tinkling of broken pieces of glass hit my ears. The boys ran away and here I saw the poor cook. His legs hung from the window and the rest of his body lay on the exhibited merchandise. He pulled his legs behind him and there he was, sitting on the couch. He was wounded on the hands and face, and a moment later his face was covered in blood. He no longer spoke, but looked around as if not knowing what had happened. I stood at some distance, but no His legs hung from the window and the rest of his body lay on the exhibited merchandise. He pulled his legs behind him and there he was, sitting on the couch. He was wounded on the hands and face, and a moment later his face was covered in blood. He no longer spoke, but looked around as if not knowing what had happened. I stood at some distance, but no His legs hung from the window and the rest of his body lay on the exhibited merchandise. He pulled his legs behind him and there he was, sitting on the couch. He was wounded on the hands and face, and a moment later his face was covered in blood. He no longer spoke, but looked around as if not knowing what had happened. I stood at some distance, but nodared to approach him, fearing that the shopkeeper would do me harm. The two armed men went into the shop and tore Ivan from the exhibit. Here he stood and wanted to leave, but the shopkeeper restrained him and a loud quarrel arose between him and the armed men. At last they seized the wounded sailor in their arms and the three of them, Ivan in the middle, left the shop and, followed by the boys who had returned, went through a few streets until they came to a large building in front of which stood two soldiers guns. A large door opened, Ivan with the armed men entered and the door closed behind them. I wanted to go in too, but one of the soldiers drove me away. It was clear to me that the cook was in prison and here I was standing in the big Patersburg with enough money in my pocket, but without any other help. I criedmewanted to do the same. I decided to wait patiently until the trio returned, but how great was my disappointment when, after a while, only the armed men returned. Why didn’t Ivan come back too? Would he stay behind that big door? I would gladly ask the two men or the guard about it, but they would not understand me. Anticipating that a longer wait at that door would be in vain, I considered what to do and decided to return to the harbor to lead one of the crew to the soldier so that he could find out why Ivan had not left that large building. So I set off, but stopped at once; where should i direct the steps? I didn’t know that and I couldn’t find out about the way to the port, because no one would understand me. More than ever I experienced how inconvenient it was for me not to be able to speak the language of the townspeople in whose midst I was. I was like a deaf-mute among thousands of people. Who would help me? I looked around to see if on occasion a sailor was passing by so that I can follow him; perhaps he would go to some ship in the harbor and through him I could find mine. I waited until a person passed by who seemed to me to be a sailor on the outside, and I followed him at some distance. For a long time I walked again through many streets that were more beautiful than the ones I had seen so far. The supposed sailor did not go to port, but stopped in front of a house, the door of which he opened with a key. He disappeared behind that door and with him my hope, to soon find my schooner. I did not expect his return, but went on through very beautiful streets and along gardens. More than a hundred times I had heard of a garden, but now I saw one with real trees and sitting on the door of one of those gardens, I admired the trees and the flowers. On many places stood painted benches, where gentlemen and ladies sat. Willy-nilly I remembered John, who, as he wrote, rested on such a bench in Hamburg after walks. The next few days I might as well rest on a bench. The next few days! … I was suddenly struck by the thought that an approaching night was ahead of the first next day. Where should I spend that first night? John was sleeping under a bridge or in his attic. But I didn’t see a bridge and I didn’t have an attic in this town. I only had money, and even a full bag, but how should I rent a room (four- or five-story); how would I know I wanted to rent one? Here again the fence, the ignorance of the language presented itself. In spite of everything that an already approaching night preceded the first next day. Where should I spend that first night? John was sleeping under a bridge or in his attic. But I didn’t see a bridge and I didn’t have an attic in this town. I only had money, and even a full bag, but how should I rent a room (four- or five-story); how would I know I wanted to rent one? Here again the fence, the ignorance of the language presented itself. In spite of everything that an already approaching night preceded the first next day. Where should I spend that first night? John was sleeping under a bridge or in his attic. But I didn’t see a bridge and I didn’t have an attic in this town. I only had money, and even a full bag, but how should I rent a room (four- or five-story); how would I know I wanted to rent one? Here again the fence, the ignorance of the language presented itself. In spite of everythinghowever, I had to spend the first night somewhere, and I started looking. I couldn’t lie in those gardens, so I went on, always on to look. It’s getting late, so I should hurry and not waste time. After a long walk I noticed a garden that was completely surrounded by a high wall. It must have been a garden because I saw the tops of trees above the wall. I walked along the wall and found an iron gate that stood half closed. I looked inside. A large garden with many trees on all sides stretched out before my eyes and in the distance beside the wall I noticed a low cottage. I went through the bar door and started walking. I didn’t see people anywhere. Everywhere on the grass stood crosses of marble or wood with gold inscriptions, and small low roof-shaped hills seemed scattered everywhere between the crosses. I went on through beautifully raked paths and marveled at the many garlands that lay on a few hills or hung on crosses. What struck me most was the great silence that reigned everywhere. Only a few birds sang on the trees, but other than that I heard nothing. I thought that the owner of such a garden would be a very rich gentleman, but at the same time I was astonished, that the beautiful expensive garden was completely abandoned. Walking further past benches, I reached the cottage. It was almost empty. Paintings were missing as well as photographs or a mirror. Only very thick ropes and four spades lay on one wall, and on the opposite wall stood on the sandy floor two very strange objects of black-painted wood. They looked like low stools and were carried away by two protruding slats, nailed at the two longest sides. On each stool lay a black cloth. They looked like low stools and were carried away by two protruding slats, nailed at the two longest sides. On each stool lay a black cloth. They looked like low stools and were carried away by two protruding slats, nailed at the two longest sides. On each stool lay a black cloth.

In this cottage I decided to sleep, but as it was still too early, I went out for a walk until I became drowsy. I then walked through the narrow paths past crosses and hills, sat down from time to time on a bench to quietly look at the beautiful surroundings. Eventually I got tired and felt sleep falling on me, and I went back to my cottage. I lay down on one of the low benches, covered myself with the black cloth, closed my eyes, and soon fell asleep.