Famous writers and their wardrobe

George Sand was born in Paris in 1804. In the eyes of her contemporaries, her way of life shocked the world. She supported herself by writing, divorced her husband, and fell in love with men and women. She lives on her own and travels in her own way between Paris and other parts of France-she often wears men’s clothing when she is happy and smoking cigars is also common. She questioned society and rejected the gender classification of society. She is successful in a world where it is generally believed that only men should have careers and ambitions and realize their own desires. Colette is an untamed stunner whose instinct drives her to describe the world she knows and the feelings of women she knows. For her, clothes exist to nourish and comfort the soul; they pretend to be an indulgent life and are the expression of inner character. She uses them to make her life and the lives of the characters she creates in her writing shine.

Noble intellectualism runs through the goals and attitudes of the “Beatles”, and Alan Ginsburg’s glasses are the perfect embodiment of it. His work “Howl” became an anthem of the radical generation in art. He usually wears sloppy pants and unmatched tops, but it is a pair of round glasses that integrates his clothes. Ginsburg never intended to become a fashion hero, he has more important things to do. But his glasses are indispensable, they are the actual symbol of his brain power and insight.

In the 1905 essay “The Russian Emperor”, Mark Twain said: “There is no power without clothes.” His favorite color of clothes is white. When he was 70 years old, he wrote in his autobiography that he was sad to give up wearing a white suit in October, “I hope I will accumulate enough courage a little bit to wear white clothes all winter in New York.”

Colette is an untamed stunner, whose instinct drives her to describe the world she knows and the feelings of women she knows. For her, clothes exist to nourish and comfort the soul; they pretend to be an indulgent life and are the expression of inner character. She uses them to make her own life and the lives of the characters she creates in her writing shine.

The Fitzgerald and his wife led a fast-destined and frivolous life—they spent money like water, spent the whole year on vacation, destroyed hotel rooms, got so drunk all day, and broke up with friends casually. Their way of life ultimately ruined themselves. Their fashion ideas became a symbol of an era that admired gorgeousness and profligacy.

Oscar Wilde doesn’t care about anything, just enjoy life in time. He was shrewd, and for a while, when the world could understand him, everything was calm-velvet cloak, breeches, sunflowers, stockings, etc. Wilde was open-minded, and he found beauty in the most unexpected places without any staleness; it was this unconventional innovation that made him praised for a period of time, and his all sorts of weird talks made everyone fascinated.

Born in Proust, Paris in 1871, he was a playboy of the Belle Epoque. He wears clean white gloves and a Carter orchid on his chest. This is a luxury he buys from the La Chaux flower shop in Paris every day. He followed and embodied the beauty and exquisiteness of that era—hair combed into waves, slicked hair, and mustache full of the exquisiteness of that era.

David Foster Wallace’s charming dress style is both lazy and skateboarder. He doesn’t shave, his hair is long and greasy, his wrinkled T-shirt and faded jeans are casually put on him, plus the finishing touch-a printed turban, and you’re done. He lives in his clothes, and his clothes accurately reflect who he is-a literary copy of a rock star.