Death lurks

On the afternoon of the day Tarzan discovered the conspiracy camp, the guard suddenly snapped from the crumbled outer wall of the ruined city of Opar, a group of men moving from the ridge of the surrounding rock belt down into the valley. Tarzan, Jane Clayton, and their black wazirs were the only strangers Opar residents had seen in their male memory in the valley, and only half-forgotten fables from ancient times vaguely suggested that other strangers had ever visited Opar. But from time immemorial, a guard had always stood on the ridge of the outer wall. Only a single, bent, grouped, and ugly human-shaped object now squatted to resemble the numerous, supple warriors of the lost Atlantis. For, over long ages, the breed had become polluted and finally, by occasional congregations with the great apes, had degenerated into the present animal nation of Opar. Strange and inexplicable had been the caring instinct of nature, which had limited this racial deterioration almost exclusively to males, with women remaining straight, graceful, and often pretty in features, even beautiful, perhaps largely due to the fact that monkey-like girls were immediately killed, somehow who had exclusively human qualities were likewise immediately cleared away.

The lone guard on the city ‘s outer wall was indeed a typical Oparian, a short, log – like, tangled – and – haired man whose puddles grew down on a low, sloping forehead. Small, slender eyes and bite-like bites showed monkey blood flowing in his veins, and the same origin was evidenced by short, curved legs and long, strong-muscled, monkey-armed arms, all barely hairy, like carcasses.

As his vicious bleeding eyes watched the team’s passage along the valley toward Opar, his increasing acceleration was indicated by a faster breathing and low, almost unheard growls rising from his throat. The strangers were therefore distant because they barely knew them to be human beings, and their numbers could only be estimated at fifty or sixty for their parties. After finding out these two facts, the guard stepped down from the outer wall, walked across the area between it and the inner wall, going in through the opening and over the wide park street behind him at a rapid pace, after which he disappeared into a dilapidated but still magnificent temple.

Opshar High Priest Kadsh sat squatting under the giant trees that had now taken over the former garden of the ancient temple. With him were a dozen of the bloodiest lower clergy, the most devout comrades of the high priest, who were startled by the arrival of this Oparian couple. The latter rushed to Kadsh in his breath.

“Kadsh!” he exclaimed, “there are strange men on their way to Opar! They arrive in the valley from the northwest behind the boundary cliffs — at least fifty people, maybe two like that. I saw them on the ridge of the outer wall as I stared, but behind them are men Since my great tarmang came here, there have been no strangers in Opar. ”

“It’s been many lunar phases since my great tarmangan, who called himself Monkey Tarzan, was among us,” Kadsh said. “He promised to come back to us before the rainy season to see that nothing bad had happened to La, but he hadn’t heard back, and La has always claimed he was dead. Have you told anyone else what you’ve seen?” he asked, suddenly turning to the messenger.

“No,” replied the man.

“Alright!” exclaimed Kadsh. “Well, let’s all go to the outer wall to see who dares to come to the forbidden Opar, and let no one snatch a word from Blagh until I give permission.”

“Kadhhi’s word is law until La speaks,” the priests chuckled.

Kadsh looked mumbled to his speaker. “I am a high priest of Oparin,” he snarled. “Who dares to defy me?”

“But La is the high priestess,” someone said, “and the high priestess is the queen of Opar.”

“The high priest can sacrifice whoever wills to the Stigmatizing God in the chamber of the dead,” Kadsh reminded others significantly.

“Yes, we blocked our mouths, Kadsh,” the priest replied creepily.

“Good!” the high priest murmured, guiding them from the garden through the back hallway of the temple toward the outer wall of Opar. From there, they watched the approaching team, which they now clearly could see in the far middle of the valley. Viewers chatted in the language of the Great Monkeys of the Low Throat, mixed with temporary words and parses of words from a strange dialect, and were no doubt some filthy debris from the ancient language of Atlantis and inherited from countless generations from their human ancestors – countless generations

As Kadshah and his companions watched from under their bushy eyebrows, the team, in the roar of the setting tropical sun, laboriously struggling forward through the quarries and barren valley, a little gray monkey peeked at them from a giant tree invading from the paving of an old street behind them. A serious, sad-looking little monkey it was, but utterly curious, like all his tribesmen, which eventually made it forget its fear of Opar’s ferocious men, even to the extent that it finally spun lightly from tree to stone, rushed out of the inner wall crack, and ran to the outer wall climbing inside. along behind the priests to a place where they could hide somewhat safely under the protection of large clumps of granite in the collapsed wall and from there listen to the conversation of the Opars,

The afternoon was coming to an end, before the team approaching Opar’s leisurely time was long enough for the various people to feel in any way, and then one of the younger priests exclaimed in excitement:

“It’s him, Kadsh. It’s my big tarmang who calls himself the Monkey Tarzan. I clearly distinguish him; others are all black men. He encourages them to move forward by pushing them with his spear. Looks like they’re scared and very tired, but he’s forcing them to make an effort. ”

“Are you sure,” Kadsh asked, “are you sure he’s Monkey
Tarzan?”
“Pretty sure,” replied the speaker, and then another of the priests agreed with his comrade’s assurances. At last they were close enough that Kadsh himself, whose eyesight was not as good as the younger members of the entourage, noticed that the Monkey Tarzan was there: indeed, he was returning to Opar. The high priest frowned angrily in his thoughts. Suddenly he turned to the others.

“He must not come,” he exclaimed; “He must not enter Opar. Hurry up to pick up a hundred warriors. We will go against them when they come out of the opening of the outer wall, and we will kill them one by one.”

“But La,” shouted the one who had angered Kadsh in the garden, “I clearly remember that La offered Monkey Tarzan an Opar friendship many months ago and that Tarzan saved La from enraged Tantor’s canines.”

“Shut up,” Kadsh growled, “he must not come here, we will kill them all, though we need not know who they are before it is too late. Do you understand? And also know that anyone who tries to resist my purpose is death’s own. – and unless he dies as a victim, he will be killed by my hand and die anyway. Do you hear? ” And he pointed at the trembling priest with his dirty finger.

When Manu, the monkey, heard all that, he was cracked with excitement. He knew Monkey Tarzan – as all monkeys roaming across Africa knew him – and knew him as a friend and protector. Manus, the males of Opar, were not animals, humans, or friends. He knew they were cruel and greedy creatures who ate monkey meat and so he hated it. He was therefore very upset about the plan he had heard was being considered, which was to kill the great tarmangan. He scratched his little gray head, the root of his tail, and his stomach, trying to separate in his mind what he heard and in the compartments of his little brain to come up with a plan to nullify the priests’ gestures and save the Monkey Tarzan. He grinned insanely, which was meant for the unthinkable Kadsh and his comrades, but did not disturb these, perhaps because a large clump of granite hid the little monkey from their sight. This was the most remarkable thing that had happened in Manu’s life. He would have wanted to jump up and down, dance, scratch, and razor — to ring and defy hated Oparians, but some instinct said it would have been of no use if he might just have gnawed on his neck a fragment of granite that priests could toss too carefully. After all, Manu is no profound thinker, but on this occasion he completely transcended himself and focused his thoughts on the matter at hand, not allowing every falling leaf or buzzing insect to disturb itself in it. Let the juicy larva go unpunished to crawl right within its reach and back again. that large clump of granite hid the little monkey from their sight. This was the most remarkable thing that had happened in Manu’s life. He would have wanted to jump up and down, dance, scratch, and razor — to ring and defy hated Oparians, but some instinct said it would have been of no use if he might just have gnawed on his neck a fragment of granite that priests could toss too carefully. After all, Manu is no profound thinker, but on this occasion he completely transcended himself and focused his thoughts on the matter at hand, not allowing every falling leaf or buzzing insect to disturb itself in it. Let the juicy larva go unpunished to crawl right within its reach and back again. that large clump of granite hid the little monkey from their sight. This was the most remarkable thing that had happened in Manu’s life. He would have wanted to jump up and down, dance, scratch, and razor — to ring and defy hated Oparians, but some instinct said it would have been of no use if he might just have gnawed on his neck a fragment of granite that priests could toss too carefully. After all, Manu is not a profound thinker, but on this occasion he completely transcended himself and focused his thoughts on the matter at hand, not allowing every falling leaf or buzzing insect to disturb himself in it. Let the juicy larva go unpunished to crawl right within its reach and back again. He would have wanted to jump up and down, dance, scratch, and razor — to ring and defy hated Oparians, but some instinct said it would have been of no use if he might just have gnawed on his neck a fragment of granite that priests could toss too carefully. After all, Manu is no profound thinker, but on this occasion he completely transcended himself and focused his thoughts on the matter at hand, not allowing every falling leaf or buzzing insect to disturb itself in it. Let the juicy larva go unpunished to crawl right within its reach and back again. He would have wanted to jump up and down, dance, scratch, and razor — to ring and defy hated Oparians, but some instinct said it would have been of no use if he might just have gnawed on his neck a fragment of granite that priests could toss too carefully. After all, Manu is no profound thinker, but on this occasion he completely transcended himself and focused his thoughts on the matter at hand, not allowing every falling leaf or buzzing insect to disturb itself in it. Let the juicy larva go unpunished to crawl right within its reach and back again. if only he might have just gotten shards of granite on his neck, which the priests knew how to throw too carefully. After all, Manu is no profound thinker, but on this occasion he completely transcended himself and focused his thoughts on the matter at hand, not allowing every falling leaf or buzzing insect to disturb itself in it. Let the juicy larva go unpunished to crawl right within its reach and back again. if only he might have just gotten shards of granite on his neck, which the priests knew how to throw too carefully. After all, Manu is no profound thinker, but on this occasion he completely transcended himself and focused his thoughts on the matter at hand, not allowing every falling leaf or buzzing insect to disturb itself in it. Let the juicy larva go unpunished to crawl right within its reach and back again.

Just as it was getting dark, Kadsh saw a little gray monkey leaving the ridge of the outer wall, fifty steps from where he himself squatted with his comrades, waiting for the warriors to arrive. But there were so many monkeys in the ruins of Opar that the incident disappeared, almost as quickly as the monkey disappeared from view, and as the day became more and more obscure he separated a small gray creature scurrying across the valley toward a group of intruders now at the foot of a large hut , or flat hill.

Little Manua was very scared to be alone outside in the field in the ever-increasing twilight, and he thanked her very quickly, curving up behind her. All the while, he created frightened glances to his right and left. As soon as he reached the booth, he climbed its wall up as fast as he could. It was actually a large, steep granite rock almost perpendicular to the sides, but weathered enough so that little Manun could easily stone its rugged surface. The monkey paused for a moment at the top to breathe and soothe the pounding of his startled little heart, and then he toured to a point where he could easily watch the team down. There really was my big tarmang Tarzan and with him half a hundred gomangans. The latter joined together long, straight clusters, which they had placed on the ground in two parallel rows. Over both, they tied smaller, straight, about eighteen-inch-long branches a couple of feet apart, resulting in a rough-made but sturdy ladder. Of course, Manu did not realize the purpose of all this, nor did he know that it was an inch that had developed in Flora Hawkes’ fertile brain to climb the abrupt hill with the opening of the Opar treasure vault exit at the top. And Manu did not know that the troupe had no intention of stepping inside the walls of Opar, nor was it in danger of falling victim to Kadshi’s hidden assassins. The danger of Tarzan to the little monkey was quite real, and so, after breathing, he immediately clarified his warning to a friend of his own people. Over both, they tied smaller, straight branches, about eighteen inches long, at a couple of feet apart, resulting in a rough-made but sturdy ladder. Of course, Manu did not realize the purpose of all this, nor did he know that it was an inch that had developed in Flora Hawkes’ fertile brain to climb the abrupt cliff topped by the opening of the exit of Opar’s treasure vaults. And Manu did not know that the troupe had no intention of stepping inside the walls of Opar, nor was it in danger of falling victim to Kadhi’s hidden assassins. The danger of Tarzan to the little monkey was quite real, and so, after breathing, he immediately clarified his warning to a friend of his own people. Over both, they tied smaller, straight branches, about eighteen inches long, at a couple of feet apart, resulting in a rough-made but sturdy ladder. Of course, Manu did not realize the purpose of all this, nor did he know that it was an inch that had developed in Flora Hawkes’ fertile brain to climb the abrupt cliff topped by the opening of the Opar treasure vault exit. And Manu did not know that the troupe had no intention of stepping inside the walls of Opar, nor was it in danger of falling victim to Kadhi’s hidden assassins. The danger of Tarzan to the little monkey was quite real, and so, after breathing, he immediately clarified his warning to a friend of his own people. Of course, Manu did not realize the purpose of all this, nor did he know that it was an inch that had developed in Flora Hawkes’ fertile brain to climb the abrupt cliff topped by the opening of the exit of Opar’s treasure vaults. And Manu did not know that the troupe had no intention of stepping inside the walls of Opar, nor was it in danger of falling victim to Kadhi’s hidden assassins. The danger of Tarzan to the little monkey was as real, and after breathing, he immediately clarified his warning to a friend of his own people. Of course, Manu did not realize the purpose of all this, nor did he know that it was an inch that had developed in Flora Hawkes’ fertile brain to climb the abrupt cliff topped by the opening of the exit of Opar’s treasure vaults. And Manu did not know that the troupe had no intention of stepping inside the walls of Opar, nor was it in danger of falling victim to Kadhi’s hidden assassins. The danger of Tarzan from the little monkey was as real, and after breathing, he immediately clarified his warning to a friend of his own people. that the troupe had no intention of stepping inside the walls of Opar and was therefore not in danger of falling victim to the hidden assassins of Kadhi. The danger of Tarzan to the little monkey was quite real, and so, after breathing, he immediately clarified his warning to a friend of his own people. that the troupe had no intention of stepping inside the walls of Opar and was therefore not in danger of falling victim to the hidden assassins of Kadhi. The danger of Tarzan from the little monkey was as real, and after breathing, he immediately clarified his warning to a friend of his own people.

“Tarzan,” he shouted in a language they both understood. The white man and the Negroes glanced upwards as they heard that parching sound.

“You know, Tarzan, I’m Manu,” continued the little monkey, “that I have come to warn you from leaving Opari. Kadsh expect with the people behind the outer wall, to kill you.”

Upon discovering that the harasser was just a little gray monkey, the Negroes immediately returned to their work, and no white man ignored its warning words. The indifference shown by the Negroes did not amaze Manua, for he knew that they did not understand his language, but he did not understand why Tarzanka did not pay any attention to him. Over and over he called Tarzan by name, over and over he screamed his warning to the monkey man, but without receiving any answer or finding out if my great tarmang had heard or understood. Manu was puzzled. What had made Monkey Tarzan so indifferent to his old friend’s warnings?

Finally, the little monkey gave up his business and looked longingly back at the trees growing inside the city wall of Opar. It was very dark now, and the idea of ​​going across the valley, where he foreshadowed the enemies lurking at night, was trembling at the polos. He scratched his head and hugged his knees and sat squatting then as a helplessly and unhappy little monkey. But as uncomfortable as it was on the high hill, it was relatively safe there, so he decided to stay there for the night rather than dare to go through the dark on a creepy return trip.

So he saw how the ladder was completed and lifted against the side of the booth; and when the moon finally rose to illuminate the stage, he saw Monkey Tarzan forcing his men to ascend the ladder. He had never seen Tarzan treat his black companions so brutally and cruelly. Manu knew how ferocious my great tarmang might have been to his enemy, whether they were animals or humans, but he had never seen him treat the Negroes who were his friends that way. One by one and apparently reluctant, the Negroes climbed the ladder as the white man always rushed them with his sharp spear. When they had all reached the top, they followed Tarza, and Manu saw them disappear as if in the heart of a large rock.

And after a short time, they were already starting to reappear, and now each carried two heavy objects that Manus looked very similar to some of the smaller clumps of stone used in Opar’s buildings. He saw them take the clumps to the edge of the booth and throw them down to the ground, and when the last of the Negroes had come up with his load and threw it down into the valley, the team descended one by one along a ladder to the base of the rock. But this time it was Monkey Tarzan first. Then they took down the ladder, dismantled it, and lowered the pieces near the root of the booth, after which they took the clumps they had brought from the interior of the hill, and, following Tarzan, who had settled on his forehead, set out on their way back to the edge of the valley.

Manu would have been very stunned if he had been human, but as a mere monkey he only saw what he saw, without trying to meditate much on it. He knew that people’s habits were strange and often incomprehensible. Thus, the gomangans, while not able to move through the jungle and forest as easily as all other creatures living there, increased their difficulty by carrying extra weights of metal ankle and bracelets, necklaces and belts, even animal hoists, which would only hinder their speed and make them more supportive. than such devices free of natural objects. When Manu thought about it, he congratulated himself for not being human — pity those silly, sane creatures.

Manu must have been asleep. He thought he had closed his eyes only for a moment, but when they opened them, in the morning he saw a brownish light already spreading into the deserted valley. Just fading over the cliffs to the northeast, he was able to separate the last of Tarzan’s team from starting to descend from the ridge. Manu then turned his face to Opar and prepared to descend from the podium, to huddle back to the safety of his trees behind Opar’s walls. But first he wanted to feel: Shita, the panther, could still move, and therefore he circled the trampled hill aside to a place where one could see the entire valley of the valley all the way to Opar. And from there, Manu saw something again that made him very uneasy, for a large number of the terrible men of the city dived out of Opar’s ruined outer walls. They could have been counted in full,

They seemed to be coming towards the shelter, and Manu sat down to watch their approach, deciding to postpone his return because the route to the city was clean of hated Oparians. It occurred to him that they came to reach him. The greatness of the lower objects is unusual. Even though he was just a maracti, the idea of ​​him not seeming ridiculous at all was why he would stop behind a protruding tongue of rock, just one, small, bright eye aimed at the enemy. He saw them coming closer and became very restless, though not afraid at all, for he knew that if they possibly crouched to the other side of the hill, he would have time to descend to the other side of it and be halfway to Opar before they would abrupt him again.

The warriors came closer and closer, but did not stop at the base of the booth – they did not even come quite close to it, but ignored it on their way. Then the truth flashed in the monkey’s little brain: Kadsh and his people chased after Monkey Tarzan to kill him. Though Manu was a little indignant at Tarzan’s indifference the night before, he had probably already forgotten it, for he was now as uneasy of the monkey’s imminent danger as he had been the previous afternoon. At first he was going to run ahead to warn Tarzan, but he hesitated to venture so far from the trees of Opar, even if the idea of ​​ignoring the hated Opars on the road was not enough to scare him from that inch. For a few minutes he sat watching until everyone had passed the booth, and then it was clear to him, that they headed straight to where the last men of Tarzan’s army had echoed from the valley. So there is no doubt that they chased after the ape.

Manu stared once more across the valley towards Opar. There was nothing visible to scare him from trying to return, so with the agility of his species, he crawled down the perpendicular wall of the booth and set out to whimper with some momentum towards the city wall. How he created the plan he eventually followed is hard to say. Maybe he thought it was ready as he sat in the booth watching Kadsh and his troops follow in the footsteps of the monkey man, or maybe it hit his head as he ran across the deserted area toward Opar. It might have mocked him even from the blue sky, after he had gotten back to the leafy shrine of his trees. Be that as it may, it is true that just when La, the high priestess and princess of Opar, with a few of her priestesses bathed in the pond of a temple garden, she was startled by a screaming monkey, which, waving violently, hung from its tail on a branch of a large tree reaching across the pond. It was a little gray monkey, so wise and serious looking that one could easily have imagined the fate of the peoples always weighing on its shoulders.

“La, La,” parked Manu, “they have gone to kill Tarzan, have gone to kill Tarzan!”

Hearing that name, La immediately became attentive. Standing up to his waist in the pond, he glanced questioningly at the monkey.

“What do you mean, Manu?” he asked. “It’s been many months since Tarzan was in Opar. He’s not here now. What are you interviewing?”

“I saw him,” Shouted Manu, “I saw him last night with many gomangans. He came to a large rock in the valley in front of Opar, with all his men. and they went down from the rock, and took up the stones again, and came out of the valley, and there, and Manu pointed with one of his little hairy fingers toward the northeast.

“How do you know it was Monkey Tarzan?” asked La.

“Wouldn’t Manu know his cousin and friend?” said the monkey. “With my own eyes, I saw him – I did see Monkey Tarzan.”

Opar’s La frowned thoughtfully. Deep in his heart came his great love for Tarzan — a fire that must have been extinguished when he was forced to marry Kadsh, after he had last seen the monkey man. For there is a provision in the laws of Opar that the priestess of the Stigmatizing God must choose for himself a married partner after a number of years have elapsed since her inauguration. For many months La had hoped to have a spouse from Tarzan. But the ape had not loved him, and finally La’d had to state that Tarzan could never fall in love with him. He had since succumbed to a terrible fate that had forced him into Kadsh’s arms.

After a month and a half had passed and Tarzan had not returned to Opar, as he had promised to do to see that nothing bad would happen to La, the latter had begun to believe Kadhi’s supposed death of the monkey, and although he hated the disgusting Kadsh as much as before, his love was Tarzan gradually faded into almost some sad memory only. But when he now heard the monkey man live and walked so close, it seemed like the opening of an old wound. At first, he understood little more than that Tarzan had been near Opar, but gradually Manu’s cries aroused in him an awareness of the danger of the ape, even though he did not quite realize the nature of the danger.

“Who’s gone to kill Monkey Tarzan?” he asked suddenly.

“Kadsh, Kadsh,” crocheted Manu, “he left with a multi-faceted man and follows in the footsteps of Tarzan!”

La quickly jumped out of the pond, snatched her companion’s belts and ornaments, hastily tied them in place, and then rushed through the garden and temple.