During kangtai pharm absence, the profession in oriental literature had become vacant



Far into the summer I was forced to stay home and wait for an apartment in Germany. So great and my joy was to meet my scheikh Tantavi and with him and his travel companion De Maison spend the last 10 days of my long wait, however, all this could not pose my concern and impatience to get on the road. This impatience also reduced to some extent the pleasure and the benefit I otherwise had of Scheikhens visit with us. He was happy and cheerful as usual and thereby made us with us, as elsewhere, liked by all. He himself loved our city, our people and our climate, where he found similarity with his own country, and promised that it would not be the last time he visited us. A few days before my departure, De Maison embarked on a small cruise in Finland, during which he intended to visit Tampere, Hämeenlinna and possibly some other towns and places. Finally, on July 28, since the long-haired ship’s hour a whole week has been delayed from one day to the other, I went on board the evening, followed by the mine and of the schikhen, who in a European way with a handshake and a kiss from their beard bushes Lips, but with their Arabic greeting, was the last one that from our beach wanted me a happy journey. I can’t help but mention what my Qur’an, which I kept in front of the resurfacing, some other loose things, among them my well-packed snus can, got forgotten at home, which I considered a bad omen. The 14-day journey over the Baltic Sea troubles was replaced with me by the pleasure of being on the lake, and it was seldom it occurred to me too long. since the ever-long ship’s hour a whole week has been delayed from one day to the other, I went on board the evening, followed by the mine and of the schikhen, who in a European way with a handshake and a kiss from their beard-bushy lips, but with their Arabic greeting, was the last one that from our beach wanted me a happy trip. I can’t help but mention what my Qur’an, which I kept in front of the resurfacing, some other loose things, among them my well-packed snus can, got forgotten at home, which I considered a bad omen.

The 14-day journey over the Baltic Sea troubles was replaced with me by the pleasure of being on the lake, and it was seldom it occurred to me too long. since the ever-long ship’s hour a whole week has been delayed from one day to the other, I went on board the evening, followed by the mine and of the schikhen, who in a European way with a handshake and a kiss from their beard-bushy lips, but with their Arabic greeting, was the last one that from our beach wanted me a happy trip. I can’t help but mention what my Qur’an, which I kept in front of the resurfacing, some other loose things, among them my well-packed snus can, got forgotten at home, which I considered a bad omen. The 14-day journey over the Baltic Sea troubles was replaced with me by the pleasure of being on the lake, and it was seldom it occurred to me too long. who in a European way with a handshake and a kiss from their beard-like lips, but with their Arabic greeting, was the last one who from my beach wanted me a happy journey. I can’t help but mention what my Qur’an, which I kept in front of the resurfacing, some other loose things, among them my well-packed snus can, got forgotten at home, which I considered a bad omen. The 14-day journey over the Baltic Sea troubles was replaced with me by the pleasure of being on the lake, and it was seldom it occurred to me too long. who in a European way with a handshake and a kiss from their beard-like lips, but with their Arabic greeting, was the last one who from my beach wanted me a happy journey. I can’t help but mention what my Qur’an, which I kept in front of the resurfacing, some other loose things, among them my well-packed snus can, got forgotten at home, which I considered a bad omen. The 14-day journey over the Baltic Sea troubles was replaced with me by the pleasure of being on the lake, and it was seldom it occurred to me too long. which I considered a bad omen. The 14-day journey over the Baltic Sea troubles was replaced with me by the pleasure of being on the lake, and it was seldom it occurred to me too long. which I considered a bad omen. The 14-day journey over the Baltic Sea troubles was replaced with me by the pleasure of being on the lake, and it was seldom it occurred to me too long.

On Friday, August 11, we finally arrived at Travemünde, a peacefully beautiful seaside resort with free views up the Baltic Sea and the beautiful fertile Mecklenburg and Holstein beaches. After taking good breakfast, at which I of my traveling companions in champagne was warmly welcomed for the first time to Germany’s soil, we all made 6, Captain Lange, included in a wagon to Lübeck, where we happened well in the morning. Alone was in the middle of Finland’s dullness and bare rocks, and its people’s drum-like eye, the glimpse of Germany’s richness and exuberant happy fields as well as the joy of its people’s self-satisfied face. But also I have always known how dear Finland is me. Lübeck appeared about what I had thought of it beforehand – only all humans seemed to me the same, as well as cast in one and the same form – men diligent, decent and prosaic, “treuberzig und bieder”; the women, the beautiful, all with a certain piece of Judaism, like more or less Julia Schäffer or her sisters, of whom you soon find all the nuances of the German qvinno beauty I have seen so far – the ordinary and ugly here most as everywhere, however, with a certain bodily freshness and fleshiness more than with us, for otherwise frank and finished with insinuous mines. But I fear that with the “biederkeit” and “treuherzigkeit” of the Germans stands as with the Swedes’ Nordic power. I did just a short round around Lubeck and marveled at the narrow streets and the old Gothic style of building. In the evening, I visited with the Staudinger Tivoli Theater, which pleased me greatly, not for the sake of the spectacle, for it was utterly pitiful, but for the sake of the institution itself. I found a great pleasure in sitting in the open and smoking their cigar, drinking their beer or whatever was pleasing, in large company and below the spectacle. The women’s hours sat 3 to 4 at small oblong tables, knit their sock, ate gla or consumed something else, and during all of this was either played on stage or in the orchestra between the records; the one who did not want to hear the music, which although not a great thing, though quite nice, could be heard, walked around and strolled in a small but pretty beautiful garden at Trave. By the way, you were completely uninhabited, wherever and every one did and sounded what he wanted. So I had a really fun evening for about 1 Rub. B: co is. I found a great pleasure in sitting in the open and smoking their cigar, drinking their beer or whatever was pleasing, in large company and below the spectacle. The women’s hours sat 3 to 4 at small oblong tables, knit their sock, ate gla or consumed something else, and during all of this was either played on stage or in the orchestra between the records; the one who did not want to hear the music, which although not a great thing, though quite nice, could be heard, walked around and strolled in a small but pretty beautiful garden at Trave. By the way, you were completely uninhabited, wherever and every one did and sounded what he wanted. So I had a really fun evening for about 1 Rub. B: co is. I found a great pleasure in sitting in the open and smoking their cigar, drinking their beer or whatever was pleasing, in large company and below the spectacle. The women’s hours sat 3 to 4 at small oblong tables, knit their sock, ate gla or consumed something else, and during all of this was either played on stage or in the orchestra between the records; the one who did not want to hear the music, which although not a great thing, though quite nice, could be heard, walked around and strolled in a small but pretty beautiful garden at Trave. By the way, you were completely uninhabited, wherever and every one did and sounded what he wanted. So I had a really fun evening for about 1 Rub. B: co is. The women’s hours sat 3 to 4 at small oblong tables, knit their sock, ate gla or consumed something else, and during all of this was either played on stage or in the orchestra between the records; the one who did not want to hear the music, which although not a great thing, though quite nice, could be heard, walked around and strolled in a small but pretty beautiful garden at Trave. By the way, you were completely uninhabited, wherever and every one did and sounded what he wanted. So I had a really fun evening for about 1 Rub. B: co is. The women’s hours sat 3 to 4 at small oblong tables, knit their sock, ate gla or consumed something else, and during all of this was either played on stage or in the orchestra between the records; the one who did not want to hear the music, which although not a great thing, though quite nice, could be heard, walked around and strolled in a small but pretty beautiful garden at Trave. By the way, you were completely uninhabited, wherever and every one did and sounded what he wanted. So I had a really fun evening for about 1 Rub. B: co is. By the way, you were completely uninhabited, wherever and every one did and sounded what he wanted. So I had a really fun evening for about 1 Rub. B: co is. By the way, you were completely uninhabited, wherever and every one did and sounded what he wanted. So I had a really fun evening for about 1 Rub. B: co is.

Aug. 12th

Combo with deligence to Hamburg, 6 Finns in the same cart. The area was also rich and happy, well-cultivated and planted, with beautiful, large forests and fertile, abundant fields; here and there some stream and arm of the trench, but no mountains. So, while I was out of sight and so unceasingly I had my eyes fixed on the fields we were over, it finally became tedious to me, and I shot my glasses on my forehead and let them fall down just for one of the many pretty farmhouses we passed by, or for some living of the so much loved and esteemed great germans in Germany, which of the people are considered almost as protective sand for the farm they please build their residence on. Appeared to Hamburg exhausted by the mere 6 hours long, but most exhausting journey in the subway, I went out to do a tour of the city, which I immediately found to be other than Lübeck. In its places, it was magnificent and magnificent like Petersburg, but here the proud Nevan was lacking; Alster and Elbe are miserable small rivers with dirty and brown water, and the canals here too can not be compared to them in Petersburg. For the rest, in its appearance, Hamburg is much more diverse, not as monotonous and tiring as Petersburg. The praised Jungfernstieg I found to be nothing special, more than the beautiful and elegant houses on the side of it. But the most important preference that Hamburg and probably all cities in Germany have over maybe everyone else, are the beautiful walks and green fields that exist to such a large amount. The basins along the Jungfernstieg were very elegant, but to a small number. The first man I bought here was an old antiquarian,Abulfeda first requested 2 mark 8, but then straight for 1 mark 12, so that one can be commissioned by the honest Germans as well as by the Russian. I walked all day up and down, mainly on the Jungfernstieg and on the dike, and saw a lot of people, but everyone, as men as women, appeared to me equally, “recht knotig”, as the German says. Here I also met two Armenians, whom I addressed in Persian and found to be the most interesting among those I saw.

Aug. 13th

Get Staudinger up to me in the morning; We drank coffee together and watched the people, who in large quantities, as it seemed, went to the country, mostly with family to spend Sunday. Was with Pacius in the Jakobi Church over a service, where at first annoyed me a gum, who with his most beautiful Sunday mine ordered around the crowd and got them seating, of course for money. During the sermon, much of the annoyance also came, as with us. The Preach, held by Schmalz, one of Germany’s most famous preachers, of a Christian’s true life in the Holy Spirit, appeared to me too much Hamburgic with his tyrants of perversion, but was not performed with the usual monotonous priestly proclamation, but more in an almost ordinary conversational tone, however, occasionally with German pathos, eye twists and manipulations. The German cannot realize that the true devotion, like the true art, does not need any twisted gestures and chaos. In truthOur Fatherneed no hand lifting or turning eyes! The German chorale also tastes me too fat and learned. What most pleased me was the preacher’s costume, which looked exactly like the Luther bar, namely, the black coat, white corset, and black cap. For the rest, nothing in the whole church that gave me devotion. From the church I went with Staudinger and one his acquaintance, to a billiard at Bellevue, and then ate dinner with them in his house. One finds himself immediately at home in a German family; The wife is like an old acquaintance and heartfelt happy if you eat with good appetite. But in the long run, living with them must be boring; for in the first few moments they show everything, and neither can one perceive anything behind, or one must still see something else than what one saw as a stranger immediately. Then we all, in a large company, seconded other artisans by his acquaintances on the railway out to Bergenhof, and visited all the pavilions, of which the Eisenbahn Pavillon most amused me; there were sailors dancing at a sloping music, so that the men mostly danced with men and the women with women. The area itself did not appear to me as beautiful as elsewhere except Hamburg. An awful lot of people were gathered here, and when we got to the city, all the streets were full, and by others I heard that all other places were full of people too. Later, we were at Peter Ahrens, where I told me that the old good and fun times were now mostly over. As it was now, it was utterly miserable, neither noble nor burlesque. There, Ingman met and then we spent, 6 Finns and a Norrman, his travel companion from Berlin, a great time at 2 bottles of champagne. Late we came home tired.

Aug. 14th

Ingman came here a bit and we drank coffee together. Then we went out to Pacius, then with him on bookcases and to antiquaries, where you often find very good books; so I succeeded in getting Desguignes Histoire des Huns in German translation. In the afternoon, Ingman and I went to Hamburger Berg, who at a folk theater the best place cost 4 skilling and White wifewas played with scattered song pieces, to which the orchestra was composed of a harp and a flute. The woman who played the harp chewed her piece of bread while she was playing, and was surrounded by a whole bunch of small children. The flute hissed terribly. However, the whole thing was not so burlesque and miserable I thought and wanted. Then we watched the Polichinelli cage, which amused me so much, that with a full neck I often had to laugh. Then we met Staudinger and all 3 went to Offen Theater, which was very boring. Then we eventually arrived at detours home.

Aug. 15th

Early in the morning, I went to the harbor alone, wandered all over and kept out and delighted my eyes at the amount of ships and the mast forest, the movement and the life I saw everywhere; then walked through the suburb of St. Pauli and the whole of Altona and Ottensen, the most beautiful plant I have ever seen here, and probably among the nicest you can see anywhere. Then, according to an agreement I met with Pacius, Ingman and a Judge doctor from here, at Alster Pavilion, from where we all 4 embarked on a so-called droschka to the new Jude hospital in St. Pauli, which seemed to be or become a very good and a well-established hospital. The doctor we had with us was a great talkative Jude. The hospital is built on Salomon Heine’s own expense, which subsequently provided about 100,000 mark banko. Then we ate dinner at Pacius, whose mother appeared to me as the best woman I saw, and the cousin, which was also there, like a genuine German girl, happy and good-natured; even here I found myself at home immediately. In the evening we were in Stadt Theatern and sawZampa , who was really miserable for Hamburg. Mr. Stritt , Zampa, was a miserable both a singer and a player, as well as M: Cornet , Camilla, both of whom gave the Gastrollen here. The theater was poorly visited and most seemed to be foreigners. Even the scene and the salon were neat, yet nothing in comparison with the great theater of Petersburg, but about comparable to the Alexandrian.

Aug. 16th

Visit the stock exchange, which both externally and pleasantly pleased me. Met at our inn a young traveling Spaniard, who came here to learn German. A young handsome man, like Wasilieff. While I was the only one he had ever met here, who spoke French, our acquaintance was soon made. He also appeared to me immediately as gracious as I previously found Wasilieff to be.

Aug. 17th

In the evening I was with Staudinger at the Tivoli Theater here, whose institution was the same as in Lübeck, only on a larger scale and better. The garden was bigger and more beautiful, in addition there was also a Rutschbahn, down which one used in small wagons. The self theatrical theater and the orchestra were incomparably better, as well as the actors. Man here gave Die Papiere des Teufelsanother piece, which we did not see, because we arrived late, to recet for Mr. Wilde, who seemed to be the sweetheart of the audience, but also took his reputation with it too much and placed his Witz everywhere, if it fit or not . He was one of the usual German comedians, without any deeper humor and comedy, than one usually finds with all Germans. The German owns only what he calls Witz. The calmness of it lies only in its stupidity and the stupid Witzen is, the better.

Aug. 18th

Traveled in an omnibus out to Ottensen and saw Klopstock’s graph, which the least did not please me. The self-inscription spoke almost only of the love his wife loved to him, and was written in a thick and heavy plain German style; I thought about it, merely as a proof of German flatness, but did not have a heart to it for the sake of the shell. For the rest, the stone was full of names, with which the German writing box was soiled by the white marble. Then I made a short visit to Graedener’s sister, a wife Andresen, who did not like me at all. But Ottensen is still the most beautiful I have seen in Hamburg and its relocation. Then I again embarked on an omnibus to the city and got off at Steinweg, where I walked a lot and watched the Jews. Then I climbed the Michaelis church tower, to the very end, there in a small dome one had the highest view over the city and the surrounding node. Remarkable from here was the sight of the city with the red brick roofs, the narrow and crooked streets, winding in all directions between the crowded tall and narrow houses, besides which one here and there always saw a garden or some spot of green trees, and around the whole the city the beautiful embankment with its large leafy avenues; all this in the middle point of a wide, richly green field, to some extent the passage of the broad but dirty Elbe. The sight was glorious, however, there was absolutely no mountain and lake missing. Strange was the illusion of the colored fensters, especially of the red glass, which showed the whole city almost as if on fire. The number of steps up there was 563. I met here in company of 6 Englishmen and some Germans,yes wohl , which one also really hears, here in Hamburg at least, as often and with equally varied accent as with us yes so . I saw that the English took me for a countryman, and took care to give me long conversations so as not to betray me; answered only in the most common and shortest terms and had my great joy to see how well we understood each other’s mines and beckons to joke over the Germans. The affair of the church and the tower cost 1 mark, right on the tables the grant of any board of the church, and I found this slightly more. In the afternoon I did a little walk with my Spanior and bought a ticket for the steamboat Havre , packed my things and step letters to Graedener and my mine, so that on the whole night I didn’t sleep the least.

Aug. 19th

Went on the steamship HavreAt 5 pm, followed by Staudinger, the last Find I probably for a long time may see – and the cry really stood in my neck when we took leave. Coming aboard, I immediately chose a bed, where I put all my things, and looked around me a little. I found the ship to be quite average; the second cabin, where I unfortunately took my place, was dirty and somewhat shabby and I greatly regretted that I saved 25 francs, since I did not see the freedom to wander around everywhere and not get on the aft deck. Kl. 6 it went off and cost a lot of hassle until we got right out on the Elbe, for it was right now flood time and it came off us. The Elbe’s beaches are beautiful, on the right first sand heights, planted with trees, the left smooth and low, but green and fertile. Blankenese is an extremely beautiful village and so many other people we passed by; but as I did not sleep the night before and also in the very bad mood, (both at the thought of being all alone, and also that I took the other place on the steamship and arrived as it seemed in the most boring company,) I laid soon to sleep and did not wake up until we were out on the sea outside Helgoland. Then the trip went on day and night most of the time with headwind, except one day when we had the best NO with good cult. The sailors were all decent and polite Fransos, whose benevolence I seemed to win through the generous distribution of cigars, of which I in Hamburg provided me with more than I could bring into Havre. In particular, I enjoyed a little boy in 13 years, a nice and fun change, who ran around and plastered for everyone else, especially for an old sailor who, one evening, confidently lamented for me over his misfortune for having traveled at sea for 20 years without having won anything, always persecuted by fate, and finally that 3 months ago have come to the unfortunate idea of ​​getting married, and now have nothing to give birth to his wife. At this point all the little sailor stood and made grimaces and pointed horns in the forehead of the old one. Then he told me that the old sailor was married to a rag public. Something that especially amused all sailors to talk about, was their adored Napoleon and the French genius, how it really invented everything the Englishmen later did. For the French, there had been sooner than ever any other nation had ever thought of it, and from them would initially be the idea of ​​everything, although they did not give in to the effort. So everything in France would be the best thing to find. So would their steamship and their machineries, also what we were now, namelyOats, the exact machine; And it seemed to really cost the machinist that, when I asked in which city of France it was made, confess that it was from Liverpool. For the rest, the sailors were all highly polite and genuinely lovable, always ready for raising, decent to the greatest extent, and yet with all the French ease frivolous and cheerful, they were always standing on the servants’ foot with the passengers, but also always on someone too close by. Their appearance was far from southern, but I recognized them on their faces for perfect Norwegians. Also, they were all mostly from Normandy. Monday dinner we were outside of Calais and I was standing late at night on deck and looking to the right the high Britain, with two standing lighthouses in Dover, sighting over to two lighthouses on the coast of France, one a blinker in Calais, the other one standing (which I want to remember) in Boulogne, and thereupon the clearest, star-richly sprinkled sky, and at the bottom of the stern of the ship a silver-white gleaming foam liner, which cast glittering diamond beads, – a spectacle so nice and so attractive that I well had the urge to throw me in Necken’s arms. But then on the left side of the south, the star glowed so gently and yet clearly, against the north of the carpet on my right side, that I, now really worn between the south and north, went down into the cabin and laid me. – a spectacle so nice and so enticing that I have always wanted to throw myself in the Neckens arms. But then on the left side of the south, the star glowed so gently and yet clearly, against the north of the carpet on my right side, that I, now really worn between the south and north, went down into the cabin and laid me. – a spectacle so nice and so enticing that I have always wanted to throw myself in the Neckens arms. But then on the left side of the south, the star glowed so gently and yet clearly, against the north of the carpet on my right side, that I, now really worn between the south and north, went down into the cabin and laid me.

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